So I’d love for you guys to think about using affiliate marketing as a way of selling other people’s stuff. And if you’re going to talk about it anyway for free, you might as well use the affiliate link, which is usually the situation which I use it. But you can also make maybe a dedicated a channel about product reviews and things also. Or just consider making your own stuff that you’re going to sell as well.

Invest in a good microphone that you can mount on your camera. At the same time, mind your recording conditions and make it a habit to check if your audio is clear enough for your viewers to understand. For best results, use a shotgun microphone that’s designed to pick up sound mostly from the front so noise from the sides and behind the mic can be canceled out. Some vloggers even go as far as to invest in multiple microphones for different recording situations—you may require a lavalier mic (small microphones that can be pinned to your shirt) for shooting fitness videos or any other type of video that requires you to be far away from the camera, or a good condenser mic (or any mic that is commonly used for podcasting) that will allow you to do clear voice-overs.
Many YouTube channels have a custom background as a testament that this is the official YouTube presence of their brand. CHOW.com’s background is simple, high quality and highlighting what they do best, food. Making sure to incorporate those three tactics in creating your own YouTube background is vital. Here’s a link to download your own YouTube Photoshop Template for getting started with your own YouTube channel design with the proper dimensions courtesy of Line25.
Try to tell a story with your thumbnails. Show an image that sets up or teases a situation. Make the viewer wonder what happens next, or what happened before. This Amy Schmittauer thumbnail with the words “I Quit” tells a story that complements the video title. If you can feature an image that contains some action or movement of some kind, even better.

The most successful YouTube collaborations are with channels that have a similar audience but cover entirely different content from yours, because the audience won’t get a repeat of your subject matter on their channel. The fact is that all of us have multiple interests, including your audience. So anywhere you can find overlap is a great opportunity for growth.
Adding ten to twenty tags per video is an ideal way to make use of keywords relevant to your video but that couldn’t naturally fit in your title or description. Each tag should be a word or phrase (use mostly phrases), that are relevant to the content of the video as well as the ways in which you predict users would discover such a video. Follow Zappos examples of how to tag your videos with their use of keywords like how to, how to dress, 2012 fashion, what to wear, how to cuff your jeans etc.
Over time, you’ll slowly gain followers and get more comments from fans on your videos, and eventually, you’ll get messages on your personal social media accounts—you may even get some fan mail, should you decide to share your P.O. box. As much as possible, make time to connect with your viewers. Remember that your social media accounts are an extension of your YouTube channel, so try to share tidbits of your life on popular social platforms like Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat. It’s also important that you try to read and respond to all the tweets, comments, and any other messages you get (as much as you are able).
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