Throw a change-up every once in a while. If you have made a name for yourself making skits, spend an episode talking directly with the audience, answering popular questions from the comments and discussing the process of your creativity. This behind-the-scenes look will create a stronger bond with your audience and make them feel like they have an impact on your work.

A YouTube channel serves as a hub for all your companies video content, allowing you to present your product, service or mission to a platform that sees over 800 million unique users visit each month. Today we’ll explore four ways to optimize your YouTube channel to ensure your videos are being discovered, watched and shared by looking at examples from existing innovators.
Annotations allow for both increased visibility and a way for viewers to interact with your content. Expert Village’s YouTube Valentine’s Day Essentials highlights ten different Valentine’s day videos within one video using the spotlight annotation over built in features of the video. Expert Village incorporated this menu of YouTube content thru annotations in the beginning of the video, during the video and at the end of the video. Annotations used in this way help drive traffic to your content if it’s relevant, especially when highlighting videos in a series. Annotations can also help to give your viewers more ways of watching and interacting with your content as opposed to browsing elsewhere once they’ve finished watching your video.
End screens tend to work best if the on-screen presenter is still talking and giving information to the viewer. If you just cut to a screen with a color or design and no new information, viewers are likely to click off of the page. YouTube viewers are somewhat conditioned to do that now. If you continue to provide information, it will give viewers a reason to stick around.

Choose a good name for your channel. Think of a name not many people will use, but will easily remember. If it's inappropriate, you'll have a bad image. You can choose to use your real name if you'd like, or you can make up a good one yourself. Just remember once you've decided it may take a while before you can change that username again. For example, if you decided on the name "Ready Spaghetti" and then realized it to be a bad choice you might have to wait up to three months to change that name. So choose wisely.

Add channel art. This is an image that is seen at the top of your channel page. YouTube will show examples of how the image will be displayed on the website, a TV, or a mobile device. Try to put the focus of the picture in the middle; when your channel is viewed on a mobile device, the sides of the picture will be cut off. You don't want to be left with half your face!

Practice editing your videos. Cut out unneeded parts of the video, and add music to keep the viewer on your video. A well-edited video will make a much stronger impression on viewers than a hastily thrown together creation. Spend some time learning the ins and outs of your video editing software. Look up tutorials on how to perform basic editing functions.
A clever innovation used in this video was after the first nine seconds of the video, when the note annotations changed over to spotlight annotations. Expert Village used both forms of annotations on this video series because note annotations draw more attention and take over more of the screen visually; therefore changing over to spotlight annotations after the first nine seconds removes the more distracting calls to action from the video experience, but still keeps them in a smaller form with the use of spotlight.
Some YouTube channel owners publish videos once or twice a week and they let their viewers know about this schedule (usually at the end of each video) so viewers know when to check back. This gives a channel a bigger chance of getting a steady flow of views, especially once it gains a number of active subscribers. Once you figure out a convenient schedule that works for you, stick to it. You should be improving and getting more attention in no time!

When you're driving in traffic and you might have to move from lane to lane, again, you don't want to make a move unless you're sure it's safe. Check your mirrors. Turn your head if you have to. Don't make that lane change. Don't move to the left or the right lane unless you're absolutely sure that there isn't a car there and you're going to be going into a difficult situation.

John Lincoln (MBA) is CEO of Ignite Visibility (a 2017, 2018 & 2019 Inc. 5000 company) a highly sought-after digital marketing strategist, industry speaker and author of two books, "The Forecaster Method" and "Digital Influencer." Over the course of his career, Lincoln has worked with over 1,000 online businesses ranging from small startups to amazing clients such as Office Depot, Tony Robbins, Morgan Stanley, Fox, USA Today, COX and The Knot World Wide.
This is one of the most usable annotations of them all. It’s a simple square that you can enter text into, as well as the links to other YouTube features like the speech bubble allows you to add. This annotation looks professional and is an easier way to present links to relevant destinations like a brand’s Twitter account or website. A marketer could utilize this annotation in a similar way to the speech bubble, but this annotation is more relevant for a variety of video content.
Hi everybody. This video is about noob, hacker and professional. Each of them will perform the same task, but the noob will do it badly and slovenly, which sometimes looks very funny. A professional will always perform tasks very well and competently, which deserves respect. The hacker will perform the tasks with cunning and cheating, deceiving to play not by the rules. Here is such an interesting challenge, pleasant viewing!
A clever innovation used in this video was after the first nine seconds of the video, when the note annotations changed over to spotlight annotations. Expert Village used both forms of annotations on this video series because note annotations draw more attention and take over more of the screen visually; therefore changing over to spotlight annotations after the first nine seconds removes the more distracting calls to action from the video experience, but still keeps them in a smaller form with the use of spotlight.
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