Over time, you’ll slowly gain followers and get more comments from fans on your videos, and eventually, you’ll get messages on your personal social media accounts—you may even get some fan mail, should you decide to share your P.O. box. As much as possible, make time to connect with your viewers. Remember that your social media accounts are an extension of your YouTube channel, so try to share tidbits of your life on popular social platforms like Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat. It’s also important that you try to read and respond to all the tweets, comments, and any other messages you get (as much as you are able).
Feedspot has a team of over 25 experts whose goal is to rank blogs, podcasts and youtube channels in several niche categories. Publishers submit their blogs or podcasts on Feedspot using the form at the top of this page. Our expert editorial team reviews and adds them to a relevant category list. Ranking is based on relevancy, blog post frequency(freshness), social metrics, domain authority, traffic and many other parameters. We routinely remove inactive blogs and those which are no longer relevant to a given list. List is updated as we receive new blog submissions and re-ranked every few weeks.
Following the URL, include your most important keywords in the first few sentences of your description because some of your description. This is because depending on the length, gets hidden behind the show more tab. Aim to have at least a 250 word description using key phrases you’ve researched for the title of the video. Remember to keep your videos balanced with use of key phrases, while remaining natural.
Did you know that YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google? As a Google product, YouTube has climbed to the top with over 4 billion videos being viewed every single day and a staggering 60 hours of video getting uploaded every minute. Uploading and marketing your videos on YouTube can help give your content visibility in both YouTube and Google search.
Hub videos are community-focused and designed to create a strong bond among your viewers and you, and your viewers and each other. In hub videos, you might respond to comments, answer questions, interact via live video, initiate projects that require viewer participation, or share personal stories that give fans a behind-the-scenes peek at your channel.
So I’d love for you guys to think about using affiliate marketing as a way of selling other people’s stuff. And if you’re going to talk about it anyway for free, you might as well use the affiliate link, which is usually the situation which I use it. But you can also make maybe a dedicated a channel about product reviews and things also. Or just consider making your own stuff that you’re going to sell as well.

How you hook viewers depends on you and your content. If a video features a project of any kind, show the end result first. A stunning result makes people more interested to see how you achieved it. This approach is great for DIY and makeover videos. For instance, Cute Girls Hairstyles always begins by showing the end result before explaining how to create a hairstyle.
Any opportunity to showcase links to your other social networks, blogs, website etc is worth utilizing. With YouTube’s latest upgrade to the look and feel of the channel there’s new ways of displaying your other online properties. Many brands, like Oralbrush and Dell as seen below, choose to utilize the space about their channel at the top right of the dashboard as a place to link to their Twitter, Facebook, blog, website and other destinations of relevance to their YouTube audience. It also allows for a brief description of your channel which should be utilized with keywords and natural phrasing in mind, much like the optimization of your metadata above.

Try to tell a story with your thumbnails. Show an image that sets up or teases a situation. Make the viewer wonder what happens next, or what happened before. This Amy Schmittauer thumbnail with the words “I Quit” tells a story that complements the video title. If you can feature an image that contains some action or movement of some kind, even better.


Invest in a good microphone that you can mount on your camera. At the same time, mind your recording conditions and make it a habit to check if your audio is clear enough for your viewers to understand. For best results, use a shotgun microphone that’s designed to pick up sound mostly from the front so noise from the sides and behind the mic can be canceled out. Some vloggers even go as far as to invest in multiple microphones for different recording situations—you may require a lavalier mic (small microphones that can be pinned to your shirt) for shooting fitness videos or any other type of video that requires you to be far away from the camera, or a good condenser mic (or any mic that is commonly used for podcasting) that will allow you to do clear voice-overs.
YouTube is an excellent way to get noticed on the internet and, in some cases, you can even use it to earn a living. To make a YouTube channel, you'll need to set up the channel using a Google account and add channel art, a channel description, and a channel name. After creating your YouTube channel, develop eye-catching video content, and actively maintain and promote your channel to generate popularity.

Optimizing your metadata helps get your videos discovered by a relevant audience more likely to watch your video. The more views a video gets in a short time period of time, the higher it will rank for a variety of key phrases related to its subject. All and all, the first step to your YouTube strategy should be to follow Zappos in the steps described above and optimize your quality video content from the beginning.
The most successful YouTube collaborations are with channels that have a similar audience but cover entirely different content from yours, because the audience won’t get a repeat of your subject matter on their channel. The fact is that all of us have multiple interests, including your audience. So anywhere you can find overlap is a great opportunity for growth.
Yeah. The concern from an SEO perspective is that YouTube, their goal is to keep people on YouTube for as long as possible, watching as much content as possible, engaging with as many videos as possible, seeing as many ads as possible. And so if your video ends the viewing session for a viewer, like they watch your video, then they click on that link and go to that company’s website and buy the product, that’s great for you, but your video could potentially not perform. If everyone who watches the video took you up on that offer, your video could potentially not perform as well as it otherwise might.
I try to personally just err on the side of being as transparent as possible about my relationship with the brand. So if they gave me a free product, and I’m not getting compensated for it, I’ll just say that. If it’s an affiliate relationship, like they have no idea who I am, that I’m even talking about it, but I do get a small percentage of the sale, thank you. I just try personally just to be– because trust is the main thing, like currency with your viewers that is most important. And anything that could kind of potentially violate that, personally I’m just like, I want to be completely up front with you guys about everything, whatever’s going on, so there’s no questions. And you guys can always feel like you can trust what I’m saying.
So I’d love for you guys to think about using affiliate marketing as a way of selling other people’s stuff. And if you’re going to talk about it anyway for free, you might as well use the affiliate link, which is usually the situation which I use it. But you can also make maybe a dedicated a channel about product reviews and things also. Or just consider making your own stuff that you’re going to sell as well.
Gary is well-known for his public speaking at conferences and for sharing all he knows about marketing and building businesses with his audience. This is reflected in his cover photo, which displays Gary in mid-flow giving a presentation at what seems to be a large event. The inclusion of his handle @garyvee helps users to identify him on other social chanels and his signature branding makes the art feel personal.
YouTube’s search algorithm takes into account many factors to determine what videos show up for what keywords. Keep this in mind when naming your playlists because it’s one of the factors YouTube takes into account to determine the subject matter of a video. Keep the title short, descriptive and use YouTube’s Keyword Suggestion Tool as a reference for finding keywords with a substantial global monthly search volume. Make sure when you’re using this tool to search with exact match types and to only use it as an approximate estimate on the value of certain keywords.
About Youtuber Jennifer McGuire shares handmade kindness through cardmaking. Jennifer McGuire is a stamping enthusiast and crafting instructor who has been sharing her love of crafting and handmade acts of kindness since 2002. In the past thirteen years, her blog, YouTube videos, publications, and classes have helped her reach thousands of paper crafters worldwide.
Add channel art. This is an image that is seen at the top of your channel page. YouTube will show examples of how the image will be displayed on the website, a TV, or a mobile device. Try to put the focus of the picture in the middle; when your channel is viewed on a mobile device, the sides of the picture will be cut off. You don't want to be left with half your face!
×