Priit is the founder and CEO of DreamGrow Digital, an internet marketing and social media company. With his 20+ years internet marketing experience he is Helping companies to understand and use the digital marketing to reach their target audiences. He's also writing on a personal growth website FixWillPower.com. He has spoken at hundreds of seminars and conferences on different aspects of internet marketing. Priit is also the organizer of Digital Elite Camp, a leading traffic and conversion event.
For channel art, choose something that represents your business while being visually dynamic. I highly recommend using graphic design tool Snappa to create your YouTube channel art. They have pre-made templates that are sized to fit your channel perfectly, all of which are fully customizable. Try to use similar colors, fonts, and stylistic choices that you make on your website and profile picture. You can also add text to help get your point or brand across more quickly. A great example is AdEspresso’s own channel art:
When marketing on YouTube, it’s important to recognize and consider your audience’s stage in the buying process. Some marketers try to cold-sell to customers and prospects who might be interested in their products. The problem is that people who find your videos on YouTube are usually in the discovery stage and aren’t ready to commit to a purchase.
As it does, you can enter in the video’s basic information, including its name, the video description, the privacy settings, and which playlist you’d like it to appear on. You should also add tags, which helps the video show up in relevant searches. You’ll want to make sure that the video’s text is optimized for SEO; we’ll go over this in the next section.

The popularity of video also means that more content at the top of the funnel has to be in video format. In B2C it’s almost obvious. But B2B-people are people, too. Video content is more likely to keep the audience in the comfort zone, and they will not engage in system 2 thinking. System 1 autopilot mental state should lead to less critical thinking, less friction, and more conversions.


I am not even appearing in the SERP (Youtube) while searching for the title of the video. Another point is we have distributed the copyright of our video with other premium youtube channel and now they are appearing almost everywhere in the SERP (even when a user search for the title). They are also expending $90 on a daily basis to promote that video.
YouTube doesn’t get as much attention from marketers, or on social media news sites, as some of the other platforms do. That’s probably because people aren’t really on YouTube to share content—they come to view it, just like they visit a blog to read a post. The good news for brands is this means when someone arrives on your YouTube channel, they’re ready to hear what you have to say. When approached correctly, marketing on YouTube can provide plenty of ROI.
You should focus on targeting one goal per video (as we talk about here). Some of the most common video goals are to increase brand awareness, views, clicks, or inbound links or social shares. Depending on how you use the video in your marketing material, the goal could be to increase the open rate of an email series or improve the conversion rate on a landing page. YouTube is a great platform for growing brand awareness.
Hey Brian! As you know I like to perfect my video rankings in Google. So I would like to share what’s been simply amazing for me. Case study Google search tube sniper pro or any version of that keyword, review, 2, 2 review. And I’m number 1. Won’t share all my secrets but I’m more than generous. I’ve managed to rank well by doing 3 simple things. 1. Using Soovle.com to get lsi keywords. 2. Commenting on the top 3 videos on YouTube for my topic. 3. Adding the top 3 ranking videos on Google YouTube username to my tags and the end of my description. What really helps my rankings is the suggested video views I get from adding the top video tags. Google loves that. Picture this… if the top rated video is being watched and the link is being clicked then the user is finding what they were looking for in Google’s eyes. Genius really.
Yeah. So I used to run a blog that I learned a ton about affiliate marketing with. And I recently sold that blog and came over to YouTube and started a YouTube channel, and realized that nobody was using affiliate links. And I was like, what is going on? Especially the huge channels weren’t using these, and they weren’t using them the right way. And I thought, oh, I’ve got to tell everyone that they can make a lot of money without sponsored videos. So I’ve just come over and started my own channel about helping people live the ultimate life for less, and been incorporating affiliate links and then showing other people how to do it.
Amazon’s obviously a really big one. It’s an easy one that a lot of people like to use. So I would start with Amazon if you’re new to affiliate links. The other places I would check would be CJ.com, LinkShare.com, ShareASale.com, and ImpactRadius.com. They’re like the affiliate networks or the houses that house all the different brands inside. So you can find the Wal-Marts and the Targets or whatever inside those networks. So once you get approved for their service, you can just start applying to all those different ones.
I have 1 little problem with your claim about longer videos being better. Personally when I’m looking for a how to solution to a problem I prefer shorter videos because then I won’t have to click through the video to get to my answer. I think eventually it will be about offering the best information in the shortest span of time. I think ultimately that the retention rate of a shorter video with the same quality will beat a longer video just because it has less retention.. because people prefer easy and fast solutions. What do you think?
A purchase may have been made, but there's still a lot of video can do to leverage the post-conversion stage of your flywheel. During the "delight stage" of the inbound methodology, your goal is to continue providing remarkable content to users that makes their interaction with your product or service as incredible as possible. It's also in hopes that they'll tell their connections about their experience or up-sell themselves. Therefore, the goal of this type of video is to encourage your customers to embrace your brand and become brand evangelists.

I read this post months ago. Now that I’ve got around 80 videos and 90 subs, I read it again with a different eye. Trying to really understand ‘keyword’. If I understand you, the keyword isn’t the ENTIRE title. It’s 2 or 3 words that you’re trying to make a video on, the rest is ‘filler’ so that the title makes sense. Is that correct? If so, I’ve been doing this all wrong. And should probably go thru and change all of my video titles. Oh, and I thought we were supposed to fill in all 500 characters of video tags. I’ve been trying to do that. Have I been stuffing without realizing it? Thanks for the great post!


By creating information-dense, accessible, easy-to-interact-with video content, brands can develop a substantial online following and promote customer recall. For an example of a company that’s done this particularly well, consider Headspace, a meditation app that became a $250 million business. The app offers multiple levels of meditation, employing gamification to increase engagement. Users must complete and master each meditation level before advancing. Most sessions are in video format, beautifully crafted with illustrations and layouts true to the brand. It is elegant, consistent and engaging, heavily relying on video.
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