Because the YouTube algorithm builds on itself, the more people watching your videos, the more visible your videos become. The metadata you've just created will help your individual videos get discovered, but just like with any business, it's important to have returning customers. In the YouTube world, the key is getting subscribers: people who will come back to see new content as you create it.
For instance, instead of “Company name,” try “Company name: Keyword” with your keyword being your industry, your service, your product or any term that helps define your brand and enable searchers to find you. Best practice is to approach this not as additional characters to fill with jargon about you but as a mechanism for users to come across your company organically – so put yourself in their shoes.
Product reviews and demo videos can be created by brand ambassadors in exchange for free products. If you can find people in your industry looking to boost their social following, this can be a great way of essentially getting free advertising. Doing this can also help you to find out information about the product if the people doing the video reviews have a lot of engagement and comments. So in a sense, it can function like market research.
Engagement reports help you learn what content is resonating with your audience. Here you can see what viewers are clicking, sharing, commenting, and promoting. You can also see how your cards and end screens are performing in your engagement reports. Cards and end screens reports help you learn what your audience is engaging with so you can optimize your calls-to-action in future videos.
Did you know that the top listing in Google’s organic search results gets an average of 34% of the clicks? The second gets around 20%. The third gets 13%… That means all the rest of the results on page one (paid and organic) fight over the remaining 16%. The paid results only get about 5% of the traffic — it’s a horrible affliction referred to as “ad blindness.”
You can choose a feature video from any of your uploads, or create a video specifically for this purpose. I recommend doing the latter; it allows you to create a short video (no more than 90 seconds, preferably) to welcome viewers to your channel and explain what you can offer them. This brief clip may not seem like a big deal, but in my experience it can go a long way in getting people to subscribe.
Channel optimization, much like video optimization, means optimizing for the algorithm and the audience. You need to use keywords, metadata, and other best practices to perform better in search and suggested videos. You also need to create a viewing experience that rewards continued viewing and makes the channel appealing to the viewer right off the bat.
Growing your subscriber base initially relies on getting your content in front of new people. While this can happen through social shares, you’re also likely to connect with your target audience on YouTube by focusing on the right keywords. This is because both Google’s search engine and YouTube’s own search engine are reliable ways to steer people to specific content they’re searching for. In other words, on Facebook and Instagram people are more likely to stumble on your content whereas on YouTube they’re seeking it out.

I do not think this is how most people use YouTube. YouTube videos are more like blog posts, and fit more effectively into the niche of content marketing. Sure, people will comment—but they do so in a manner similar to how they comment on blog posts. They come to view and digest videos, not necessarily share their thoughts about the day. Because of this, you should approach YouTube as content marketing instead of social media marketing.

Videos are amazing for getting all sorts of messages out there, and if we think in terms of practicality, a short, unique explainer video can do a world of difference when it comes to educating people on the ins and outs of your particular product. By using storytelling and unique types of media you can easily catch people’s attention and hold it while they’re actually entertained.
Video marketing is not just about bringing the best and amazing graphics to the world and making all the visual efforts in it, but more importantly, it is about what content you bring out through your amazing and aesthetic visual skills. The first section of this post discussed how content is the king of any kind of marketing, and this is what you have a bear at first. You have to be creative and innovative in creating your storyline and content. Overcoming the content mediocrity is the first step to the success of video marketing.
14. Add tags that will apply to most of your videos — Tags help people find your video when searching on YouTube. Proper tagging can help increase monetization of your videos. Some suggested tags would include your artist name, any common misspellings, and popular keywords associated with your genre. Make sure tags with more than one word are enclosed in quotations, and don’t use commas. Avoid overly generic tags or tags that are not relevant to your video. Create your default tags here http://www.youtube.com/account_defaults.
With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight — you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?

In an ideal world, the best way to do it would be to upload and send your entire video in the body of your email. But, while you can probably embed a video using HTML, most email platforms have made viewing this video format directly in an email nearly impossible. The better way to ensure that all of your subscribers can view your video is to do something like this:
To begin adding annotations, select edit video on a video you’ve already uploaded to your channel and then select the annotations tab. In the annotations dashboard you can scroll throughout your video, selecting the timeframe where you wish to add an annotation from the add annotation drop down menu. There are six different types of annotations to help drive further interaction with your videos, each with a different purpose for optimizing your content.

As mentioned above, choosing the right platforms is an important part of getting great results for video marketing. The “right platform” isn’t necessarily the one that has maximum reach but instead, it is the one that gives you multiple benefits and most importantly is the one where your target audience can reach easily. It could be a content marketing platform, a video publishing platform or even a social networking site. Now you might be thinking about these platforms. To make it easy for you; we here have listed some of them.
As a part of your comprehensive online marketing strategy, planning your content publishing and distribution is a crucial component. Create a dedicated calendar where you can plan and arrange your content. Do this for at least a month in advance to avoid being caught without content and make sure you’re hitting all the big moments, like holidays and industry events. You want to keep track of what content you’re creating, where you’re distributing it, and the specific goals of each piece.
Instagram is a mobile-first network so remember that all video content must be optimized for mobile viewing, specifically sizes as you can review below.  It’s also known for its stunning aesthetics and catchy taglines for both video and images, so keep this in mind when creating! The network is owned by Facebook so many of the same powerful ad targeting campaigns available on Facebook are also available on Instagram. You can even run the same ad on both platforms.

The spotlight annotation acts similarly to the note annotation in that it allows you to link to various aspects of the YouTube network with or without text, but the only difference is it highlights a section of an existing video. Therefore, you can create aspects of your video that added with the spotlight annotation appear as custom links to your other YouTube assets. By placing the spotlight over a particular item within your video that section now acts a working link to other content.
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