Determine whether it’s better to create the video content in-house or to hire an agency to handle it. It’s tempting to go the in-house route as it’s generally seen as the most cost effective, but that can be a mistake. As Sophia Bernazzani writes, “Videos are hard to make – and it shows. The internet is populated with far too many slideshows and photos set to music that are masquerading as videos.”


Support videos help answer common questions about your product or service; explain how to use certain functions, or address common customer issues. Not only are these videos helpful, but they also convey that you’re a business which supports its products and is transparent is helping users. A great example of the reach of support videos is IKEA, which has benefited hugely by sharing videos demonstrating how to put together a range of its furniture line.

So I’d love for you guys to think about using affiliate marketing as a way of selling other people’s stuff. And if you’re going to talk about it anyway for free, you might as well use the affiliate link, which is usually the situation which I use it. But you can also make maybe a dedicated a channel about product reviews and things also. Or just consider making your own stuff that you’re going to sell as well.
Video content is often hosted on YouTube or other video sharing sites and embedded directly into your website. Not only is this a useful tactic because hosting videos on your own, tends to prolong the loading time, but when posting a video to YouTube, you have the option of populating the “description” box with links to other areas, such as your website and social pages.
Tone: Are you serious or sarcastic? A great approach to define your tone is to use the “We are ____, but we are not ____” exercise. In this framework, develop three bullets to help you understand the tone of the video content you’re going to produce. For example, “We are humorous, but we are not over-the-top.” These tone bullets are meant to guide you toward consistency.
Your tags will help YouTube better understand what your video is about. That will help it place your video in relevant searches and as suggestions on other relevant videos. Performing a quick YouTube search for one of the keywords in your title will help you identify more potential tags. For example, if your video is called "How to Use Old Clothes to Make New Styles," you might search the word "clothes" and see what the suggested searches are.
Just as the YouTube Creator Academy preaches getting to the point quickly in channel trailers, Brian Dean of Backlinko asserts the first 15 seconds of your video is the ideal portion to optimize. Why? Because viewers will decide within that first 15 seconds whether your video is the real deal. Once you’ve got their buy-in, your video will naturally accrue greater watch time, improving your ranking signals.
Well, the above section might have got you for its amazing points to consider while you create a video marketing strategy, but that does that end there? Absolutely not! There are a number of other things that you will have to see while you create a video marketing plan. Let’s start it with the factors that are important in creating your video marketing strategy.
When it comes to video marketing, the same rules apply. While you shouldn’t copy your competition’s ads (please don’t) you should take note of their content and see how it resonates with their audience. Are they getting a lot of likes and shares? Why is that? What social platforms are they most active on? What is the key messaging and paint point they are answering? How frequently are they sharing new content?
Lastly, a 1-hour video is capable of receiving only one instance of comments, likes and subscribes. But breaking that 1-hour video into six 10-minute chunks means you get six separate opportunities to entice viewers, gather comments and encourage subscriptions. This optimization model empowers you to compile data and review metrics on a more specific scale, which should permit you to better customize videos in the future.
What you need are deep insights into your audience. To find them you'll need to run surveys, conduct interviews and sift through data. Start by gathering basic information like demographics, then move onto more detailed considerations of personality and preferences. Be sure to get to the root of what your audience need, what they want, and which problems you can help them with.
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