Like anything else, it’s hard to know what success looks like if you don’t have goals to meet. Your goals will help dictate which platform to begin your video marketing efforts. Facebook, for example, is built for engagement and conversions and Twitter is best used to start a conversation and drive traffic to external sites. When creating your video marketing strategy, consider both the goal of the campaign and the best uses of the platform you’re distributing on.
The traffic sources report shows how viewers are finding your content online. This provides valuable insight on where to best promote your YouTube content. For example, you can see if viewers are finding your content through YouTube search or Twitter. To view more in-depth traffic reporting, click on the overall traffic source category. This data can help refine your YouTube marketing strategy. Be sure to optimize your metadata based on your findings.
Don’t go overboard with this type of content, though. You’ve probably seen some commercials and had no idea what the message was until the very end, which left you confused about the company. Make sure that your videos evoke the emotions you want customers to feel about your company, even if there isn’t a direct connection between your video content and the product you’re ultimately promoting.
Affiliate marketing on YouTube can be difficult to wrap your head around if you're a beginner or even if you've been making videos for while because when you first start making videos you don't think about affiliate marketing. There is a lot to explore on the subject, however, once you learn the basics it is possible to make money as an affiliate on YouTube.
YouTube has a library of free sound effects and music to use in your videos. Some other great resources for royalty free music are Pond5, Epidemic Sound, and PremiumBeat. Both services include thousands of professionally recorded and produced songs in a multitude of genres at varying lengths and tempos. PremiumBeat and Pond5 both include a large library of sound effects to add texture and depth to your videos. Sometimes, it only takes a subtle sound effect layer in the background of a scene to elevate the production quality of your video and really pull your audience into the story.
Lastly, Google has recently changed the way they present video in search results. Previously, video results were lumped alongside all results. Now, Google is employing a new video carousel which presents the top video results separate and apart from the rest. There are an average number of 8.5 videos on the carousel, meaning if you can get your videos highlighted here, your chances of attracting views are significantly higher. It’s not like an amusement park, there is only one ride, and it’s vital your video is on it.
If you want to get more followers, it doesn’t hurt to let your viewers know that and to actively remind them to subscribe. We all know how powerful CTAs can be, and this is no exception. In addition to urging viewers to “Subscribe!” at the bottom of your description, you can add “Subscribe Now!” CTAs to the end of every YouTube video by adding YouTube elements to the last portion of it.  Previously this could be done with annotations, but that feature has been deprecated. You can do this under the “End Screen & Annotations” tab when you’re editing your video.
Not only will transactional searchers who already know the Brafton name be able to find us but so too will informational users simply looking for “creative content marketing.” Plus, providing this next-level search-friendly info, you teach YouTube (and Google) how to properly crawl and index your channel, which allows search engines to better serve search results.
This is one of the most usable annotations of them all. It’s a simple square that you can enter text into, as well as the links to other YouTube features like the speech bubble allows you to add. This annotation looks professional and is an easier way to present links to relevant destinations like a brand’s Twitter account or website. A marketer could utilize this annotation in a similar way to the speech bubble, but this annotation is more relevant for a variety of video content.
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