Channel description: Your description should provide more information on your company and explain what type of video content you plan on sharing. Search engines look at your description when determining how to rank your profile, so incorporate relevant keywords in your overview. We’ll talk more about how to optimize specific video descriptions below.

Survey your followers. You may have a big email list of fans who may not yet be customers. Use a simple tool like Polldaddy or SurveyMonkey to ask your followers one question: What challenge would you like us to help you solve? Gini Dietrich, CEO of Arment Dietrich and lead blogger at Spin Sucks, has some great advice on surveying your audience in this episode of The Actionable Marketing Podcast.
Videos are amazing for getting all sorts of messages out there, and if we think in terms of practicality, a short, unique explainer video can do a world of difference when it comes to educating people on the ins and outs of your particular product. By using storytelling and unique types of media you can easily catch people’s attention and hold it while they’re actually entertained.
All of these benefits get you to one thing, and that is traffic. Videos drive 74% of the traffic in contemporary times. Bringing the attraction and amazing call to actions can get the viewers to be converted into traffic on your website. Even the emails that are subjected to the word video in it get a 19% increase in open rates. This is how a video increases the traffic for your site.
Without doing anything else, video content already gives an advantage in the competitive world of SEO. Multimedia content such as video has a greater chance of being shared across the web than other forms of content simply due to consumer interest. As a result, when you create marketing videos, you’re improving the chances that your content will reach a greater audience and thus increasing the authority of your page – which Google looks at quite seriously. 
I try to personally just err on the side of being as transparent as possible about my relationship with the brand. So if they gave me a free product, and I’m not getting compensated for it, I’ll just say that. If it’s an affiliate relationship, like they have no idea who I am, that I’m even talking about it, but I do get a small percentage of the sale, thank you. I just try personally just to be– because trust is the main thing, like currency with your viewers that is most important. And anything that could kind of potentially violate that, personally I’m just like, I want to be completely up front with you guys about everything, whatever’s going on, so there’s no questions. And you guys can always feel like you can trust what I’m saying.
Branding your channel helps bring a consistent experience to your viewers and subscribers on YouTube that they would see similarly reflected elsewhere. It’s important to let each marketing channel have its own feel, but also be tied together with other channels as well. Highlighting your most important videos on your channel, alongside your other social networks is a helpful way to help flaunt your digital savvy and help make it as easy as possible for your online advocates to connect with you wherever they’re active.
The video is simple. Which would you rather do – read a 30-page instruction manual or watch a 3-minute video? Complex processes are easier to demonstrate than they are to explain. It’s time-consuming. A professional-looking video will require pre-production (scripting, casting, location scouting, props), production (lighting, sound, teleprompter, shooting) and post-production (editing, graphic effects, soundtrack).

Money makes the world go round, so it isn’t a surprise that cost is a central consideration for any marketing strategy. Define what’s your video marketing budget and what you are willing to spend on each component. Use your marketing dollars wisely and invest in cost-efficient tools like Promo.com’s video creation tool to execute the videos optimized for every social channel. Then set a budget for each platform and adjust as you see your return on investment.
I try to personally just err on the side of being as transparent as possible about my relationship with the brand. So if they gave me a free product, and I’m not getting compensated for it, I’ll just say that. If it’s an affiliate relationship, like they have no idea who I am, that I’m even talking about it, but I do get a small percentage of the sale, thank you. I just try personally just to be– because trust is the main thing, like currency with your viewers that is most important. And anything that could kind of potentially violate that, personally I’m just like, I want to be completely up front with you guys about everything, whatever’s going on, so there’s no questions. And you guys can always feel like you can trust what I’m saying.
YouTube uses a cost per view (CPV) model, which means you only pay when someone engages with your video ad. If your ad is skipped, you aren’t charged for that view. The exact cost per click varies varies on keyword competitiveness, but, on average, it’s around $0.06. Once you set your daily campaign budget, YouTube will display your ad until the daily budget is spent.

Analytics tools let you look at the engagement of all the videos you have published across multiple platforms. This can help you understand where viewers are dropping off and how it differs for each platform. Knowing what viewers care about – and more importantly what they don’t – will make sure that every resource you invest in video provides a return in the form of engaged viewers.
Niche-specific challenges: It’s relatively easy to create content for the “tech how-to” niche (like “how to install Windows” or “how to use WinRar) - you just need a screencasting software and a microphone. For niches like DIY plumbing, however, you need significant time, energy and skills. This often compels marketers to flood the easier niches, increasing competition.

Here’s what you want to notice: What ads are they running? How are they approaching their customers? What’s more, what seems to be working and what isn’t? A common strategy among large corporations is to look at the competition and follow suit. Consider, how many times you see a cluster of fast food joints. Where McDonald’s appears, Burger King is never too far and, suddenly you have three or four places to source your hamburger. Great for us, more competition for them.
When it comes to video marketing, the same rules apply. While you shouldn’t copy your competition’s ads (please don’t) you should take note of their content and see how it resonates with their audience. Are they getting a lot of likes and shares? Why is that? What social platforms are they most active on? What is the key messaging and paint point they are answering? How frequently are they sharing new content?
The first is that viewer attention spans- and loyalty- are a bitch. I’m even lumping in my own impatience online here; as a user, if I click to watch a tutorial, an ad pops up, and I see a similar tutorial in the “You May Also Like This” feed, I’ll give that one a shot instead. I’m not kidding. I’ve done this twice today. You don’t want to do anything that will cause viewers to lose interest in your video, or worse, to click to a competitor’s video instead.
There will be two images that you choose. The first will be your account’s picture, which will work similar to Facebook’s profile pictures. The second will be your channel art, which will be displayed at the top of your channel much like Facebook’s cover photo. You need to choose these images wisely, as they’ll be one of the first things that users notice about your brand. In the example below, my account picture is the picture of me, and the flowers are my channel art (please note, this is only an example account).
What you need are deep insights into your audience. To find them you'll need to run surveys, conduct interviews and sift through data. Start by gathering basic information like demographics, then move onto more detailed considerations of personality and preferences. Be sure to get to the root of what your audience need, what they want, and which problems you can help them with.
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